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Finding The Best Dementia Care Facility

Assisted Living , daily lfe , Dementia , Senior Care     no comments    

Dementia is a term for mental decline that is severe enough to interfere with the activities of daily living. The most common type of elderly dementia is Alzheimer’s disease, but there are many other causes. Elderly dementia itself is not a disease, but it is a term that encompasses a wide range of symptoms.

When to Look for Help
It can be difficult to decide when a loved one with dementia should no longer live on their own. Many people with various forms of elderly dementia can live independently for years with the right support and memory aids.
Eventually your family member will need to be moved to a facility, but knowing when is difficult. This is especially true since many people with elderly dementia will often conceal their struggles. The following are some signs to be on the lookout for:
They are no longer sending letters of birthday cards regularly.
They have stopped initiating phone calls.
They are in a hurry to get off the phone every time you talk.
They are making calls at strange hours for non-emergencies.
When elderly dementia progresses, it can become difficult to carry out the steps needed to write and send a letter. Losing the ability to carry on longer conversations and communicate with letters can mean that they are also struggling with driving and cooking. When someone is struggling with self-care tasks, you might see some of the following:
Their weight is changing without explanation.
They don’t dress appropriately for the occasion or the weather.
Their clothes do not look clean or they smell.
While the previous signs indicate your loved one might be losing the ability to care for themselves on their own, the most obvious signs are much more serious. Any of these could indicate your loved one is no longer safe at home and needs to be moved to a senior care facility as soon as possible:
Having the utilities turned off because the bills are not paid.
Evidence of donations to charities your loved one does not have a history of supporting.
Robbery caused by doors being left unlocked or because of people they are letting into their home.
Getting lost of wandering off.
Choosing an Elderly Dementia Facility
One of the most important considerations is whether the senior care facility you choose cares for people with all stages of dementia. You don’t want to place them somewhere and then have to move them again when their disease progresses. This could be both frightening and heartbreaking, so make sure they can stay in their new Costa Mesa or Yorba Linda home for the rest of their lives.
You want to choose a senior care facility where the staff is specifically trained to care for individuals with dementia, and they can handle the associated behaviors such as combativeness and sun downing.
There should be specific safety precautions in place for these patients to prevent them from wandering, and these can include locked dementia units or personal monitoring systems.
Paying for Elderly Dementia Senior Care
The majority of families pay for their loved one’s residential care themselves. There are benefits that cover residential senior care, and those include long-term care insurance, Veterans benefits, and Medicaid. Medicare only pays for short-term skilled care and does not pay for the cost of long-term residential care.
At Senior Home Advocates, we have the expertise and experience to help you make the best decisions possible for your loved one with elderly dementia. We’re a comprehensive senior care agency, and we’ll be with you every step of the way.

Finding The Best Elderly Dementia Care Facility

Assisted Living , blog , Dementia , Senior Care     no comments    

Dementia is a term for mental decline that is severe enough to interfere with the activities of daily living. The most common type of elderly dementia is Alzheimer’s disease, but there are many other causes. Elderly dementia itself is not a disease, but it is a term that encompasses a wide range of symptoms.

When to Look for Help

It can be difficult to decide when a loved one with dementia should no longer live on their own. Many people with various forms of elderly dementia can live independently for years with the right support and memory aids.

But eventually your family member will need to be moved to a facility, but knowing when is difficult. This is especially true since many people with elderly dementia will often conceal their struggles. The following are some signs to be on the lookout for:

  • They are no longer sending letters of birthday cards regularly.
  • They have stopped initiating phone calls.
  • They are in a hurry to get off the phone every time you talk.
  • They are making calls at strange hours for non-emergencies.

When elderly dementia progresses, it can become difficult to carry out the steps needed to write and send a letter. Losing the ability to carry on longer conversations and communicate with letters can mean that they are also struggling with driving and cooking.

When someone is struggling with self-care tasks, you might see some of the following:

  • Their weight is changing without explanation.
  • They don’t dress appropriately for the occasion or the weather.
  • Their clothes do not look clean or they smell.

While the previous signs indicate your loved one might be losing the ability to care for themselves on their own, the most obvious signs are much more serious.

Any of these could indicate your loved one is no longer safe at home and needs to be moved to a senior care facility as soon as possible:

  • Having the utilities turned off because the bills are not paid.
  • Evidence of donations to charities your loved one does not have a history of supporting.
  • Robbery caused by doors being left unlocked or because of people they are letting into their home.
  • Getting lost of wandering off.

Choosing an Elderly Dementia Facility

One of the most important considerations is whether the senior care facility you choose cares for people with all stages of dementia. You don’t want to place them somewhere and then have to move them again when their disease progresses. This could be both frightening and heartbreaking, so make sure they can stay in their new Costa Mesa or Yorba Linda home for the rest of their lives.

You want to choose a senior care facility where the staff is specifically trained to care for individuals with dementia, and they can handle the associated behaviors such as combativeness and sun downing.

There should be specific safety precautions in place for these patients to prevent them from wandering, and these can include locked dementia units or personal monitoring systems.

Paying for Elderly Dementia Senior Care

The majority of families pay for their loved one’s residential care themselves. There are benefits that cover residential senior care, and those include long-term care insurance, Veterans benefits, and Medicaid. Medicare only pays for short-term skilled care and does not pay for the cost of long-term residential care.

At Senior Home Advocates, we have the expertise and experience to help you make the best decisions possible for your loved one with elderly dementia. We’re a comprehensive senior care agency, and we’ll be with you every step of the way.

Finding Senior Care In Anaheim California

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Aging is an unavoidable fact of life. Often as we grow older, we often become less capable of managing our affairs or taking care of our health. It is difficult to watch anyone lose capability, but it is particularly difficult when it is our own parents who need assistance with everyday life. You want the best care for your parent, but don’t know what options exist, which options are best for the needs of your parent and your family, and how much they cost.

In Anaheim, CA, the answers to those questions are quite shocking and a little bit worrisome. Just answering the first question, you could enroll your parent at a home health agency, a skill nursing facility, an assisted living residence, or an acute care hospital. Alternatively, you could pay for the services of an in-home care provider or nurse. All of these options offer different benefits depending on the physical and mental limitations of your parent, the financial situation of your parent, and the availability of nearby family and friends.

To further complicate the answer to that question, just within the city limits of Anaheim, there are a dozen home health agencies and well over 200 service the Anaheim area. There are a similarly high number of choices for the other away-from-home options. And there are literally thousands of professionals offer in-home care of one manner or another. Searching for the right answer is a bit like searching for a needle in a haystack. With such a wide range of options, what you really need when choosing Anaheim senior care is a consultant that understands the industry and can help you make the right choice.

Senior Home Advocates offers exactly the kind of consultation you need to select an Anaheim senior care option for your aging parent. Senior Home Advocates representatives are well versed in the Anaheim senior care industry, understand every option, and can advise you on which is best for the mental and physical well being of your parent based on your budgetary constraints. When working with a Senior Home Advocates consultant, you needn’t worry that the needs of your parent will be ignored. The consultant literally acts as an in person live advocate for your senior parent, prioritizing his or her needs in senior care above all else.

Your aging parent needs you to make the hard decisions about their future care, but you need help too. Contact Senior Home Advocates today to get started on arranging for that care with a free consultation from a professional that will guide you through every step of the process.

Professional Guidance on Getting the Patient to Agree to a Safe Care Arrangement

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With interest rates low and home prices high, this is the ideal time to downsize, if you have been considering selling your current home. Interest rates for a 30 year fixed rate mortgage are hovering around 4%. This is causing home prices to rise.  Because these low interest are not expected to last very long, many buyers a scrambling to purchase their next home.

It is a seller’s marketplace and for those wishing to downsize it is a good time to gather information and start planning. A big advantage to selling now lies in the amount of money you will save by shifting courses to a smaller home. If you could save $150,000 with the sale of your bigger home by buying a cheaper one, why wouldn’t you want to do so? If you invested that $150,000 by selling when in your late 60’s as opposed to your late 70’s or 80’s, you could double maybe even triple the amount you save by diversifying it elsewhere. By downsizing, you will also save on maintenance and monthly utility costs.

Another option to consider is a “reverse mortgage”. A reverse mortgage is a home loan that provides cash payments to the owner based on the homes equity. Homeowners defer payment of the loan until they die, sell, or move out of the home. Upon the death of homeowners, their heirs either give up ownership to the home or must refinance the home to purchase the title from the reverse mortgage company. This type of loan can be a good thing, if you have lots of equity, but it also has its drawbacks and should be well thought out before securing this type of mortgage.

Another route for homeowners that wish to remain in their larger homes is to go with refinancing at a lower rate. If you have an ARM, you may want to go with a fixed rate now that rates are lower. This will lower the monthly mortgage payment.

More commonly, homeowners that want to downsize and move to a new community, find that places with large concentrations of elderly citizens are more amiable than others are. For instance, homes in Southern California appeal to seniors moving from colder climates. A study conducted by AARP estimates that 25.5 million seniors ages 50 and older still have a mortgage when they reach retirement age 65+. However, having a smaller monthly payment will definitely add money to the coffers.

Yet another option once you have made the decision to downsize is to consider “retirement communities”. Senior friendly neighborhoods, mobile home parks, apartments, condominiums, and other facilities that have a 50+ regulation are increasing in popularity. They offer many activities and really foster a strong sense of community. It is a great option for those wishing to still be active. Many offer golf courses, pools, and other amenities.

Whether you decide to downsize or just want to get a fair market value on your home, always rely on a professional that is trustworthy and knowledgeable. There are many con’s directed toward seniors, therefore it is essential that you only deal with reputable companies. Keep in mind that it is always okay to ask for references and check them out. You worked hard for your money and retirement and it’s time to sit back and enjoy the fruits of your labor.

Just How Many Seniors Are There?

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The age of “Baby Boomers” is giving way to a sharp increase in the number of retirees and seniors. The technical age to be called a senior is age 65+. Baby boomers officially began retiring at age 65+ in 2006. It is estimated by the Administration on Aging, that by the year 2030 (just 15 years from now) there will be about 72.1 million older Americans, a growth increase of 19% from 2000. The number grows to an estimated 88.5 million by the year 2050. This increase in senior citizens will have a profound effect on many industries, especially healthcare.

It’s interesting to attempt to attribute the increase to the number of babies that were born post World War II, in what is considered the “baby boom era”. However, we need to also take into account that people are living longer than ever before. With advances being made in medicine, people are living on average a full 15+ years past what they did in earlier eras.

From 2003 to 2004, statistics comprised found that 351,000 seniors joined the 65+ group. 3.7 million seniors who resided in the United States in 2004 were foreign born.

4.9 million Seniors were over the age of 85 in 2004 and of those for every 45 that were men, 100 were female.

Where do the most senior citizens call home? The state of Florida is home to the most people age 65+. Of course, the good folks in the Sunshine State list Tampa-St. Petersburg’s area of having the largest population of seniors, at 18.2 percent. Drastically different in climate, Pittsburgh, PA is the second place spot, where 18 percent of the population is over 65.

Seniors do love their warm sunny days, whether they spend them on the golf course, taking a class, or walking on the beach. In Orange County, CA, folk’s age 65-74 increased 21.6% from 2000, age 75-84 increased 15%, and those age 85+ increased by 45.2%. Orange county retirees average a median household income of $47,992.

Also worth noting is that 343,308 households in Orange, County, CA have one or more persons age 60 and older.

 As a large number of the population continues to barrel toward retirement, continued growth in many industries is expected to rise. However, none changing as much as the healthcare field. Especially those that work in geriatric care, medical facilities are also expected to increase. Places like assisted living facilities, senior centers, adult daycares, and other businesses set up to help take care of our aged citizens will begin to sprout up and increase in numbers.

It’s not all about the numbers though. Our aging relatives and friends have a legacy and life lessons that we need to know. Spending time, listening, and befriending our senior citizens is the perfect way to show our caring and respect. It is a task we should not take lightly. One day, it will be us on the other side of the aging fence.

Choosing the Right Assisted Living Home

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Finding the right assisted living home for your parents or loved one is a concern that eventually many families will have to face. The high number of facilities and the long lists of do’s and don’ts can be an overwhelming feeling for people who have not made this tough decision before. In the United States alone there are over 15,000 assisted living homes, and 1,500 continuing care facilities- these numbers exclude nursing and groups homes, as well as adult communities. So, how is someone without a background in this field supposed to choose the right home for their family member? Below are a few guidelines that can help your find the best fit for your loved one.

1. Is Assisted Living the Right Choice?

If the individual is happy and comfortable living where they are, it may be a good idea to start thinking of alternative services that could better fit their needs. In- home help and assisted community living could be a great option for people who do not need the intense hands on care you might receive in an assisted living residency.

2. Do Your Research

Visiting the homes you are considering is a great way to meet the staff, and experience first hand the type of care your loved one is going to receive. Many facilities have the option of allowing people to stay for a weekend and truly see what the experience would be like.This gives everyone a chance to set expectations, tour the apartments and meet the staff.

3. Ask the Right Questions

When touring homes it is impertinent to be as specific and as detailed as possible when asking the questions about the live-in homes. Write down the questions you have such as, what does kind of amenities does the unit offer, what are the nutritious values in the meals served, what kind of activities does the place offer, etc. Think of questions that take into consideration the basic needs, as well as other necessities that will affect their stay in these homes.

4. Understand Costs

Before you commit to a facility, make sure you understand all the costs and fees associated with the plan you purchase. Research to see if Medicare, veteran’s organizations and community grants can support or supplement portions of the costs.

This is a big transition for all family members, and it is very important to make sure sure all parties involved are comfortable with the choices being made. Tune in next month for more tips that can help you make this important decision.

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